strategy tactics: dark ages

strategy tactics: dark ages, strategy, tactics, dark, ages

Hello ladies and gentlemen, Spirit of theLaw here. This video is going to be all about the Chinese. We finally get to talk about the civilizationthat invented guns, block printing and cannons and then got none of those in its tech tree. Though to be fair, the Chinese invented prettymuch every medieval technology. Now personally, while learning the game, Ialways found the Chinese to be one of the most difficult civilizations to use well. And they have a really strange start withall their extra villagers and also a unique unit that has more going on behind the scenesthan probably any other. I’ll try to keep this short, b ut there’s alot to cover, so let’s jump into it. [Intro Music] Subtitles provided by Chtyl Dubreux The Chinese team bonus is that their farmshave +45 food. Now there’s a few aspects of this to lookat and I’ll put all that information in a table. If we think of farms as a way of turning 60wood into several hundred food over time, the Chinese bonus is giving you a better conversionrate, which makes it more of a wood than a food bonus. Though if we look at the actual improvement,we can see it goes from a solid 26% better ratio early on down to only an 8% improvementby the Imperial Age. If we look at the actual collection rate,theoretically it does go up slightly because your farms are lasting a bit longer, so you’respending less time proportionally reseeding them. But it’s not a very notable increase and atbest it’s about one extra food every three minutes and becomes steadily worse over thecourse of the game. But speaking of that delay to having to refreshthem, check out the time it takes to exhaust a farm, which is worth noting because I thinkit has some convenience value, for example when you’re doing a fast Castle strategy. Normally all those farms that you’re puttingdown in the late Dark Age and early Feudal Age tend to be coming up on their nine-minutelifespan just after you reach the Castle Age and that’s the time that you’re usually tryingto get some more Town Centers and other buildings and units out. The extra two minutes that the Chinese andall of their allies get on those early farms means you’re gonna feel a crunch a coupleof minutes later, which, just subjectively speaking, I think makes things feel more manageableand to me is the big advantage of the bonus. Moving on to their civ bonuses, the firstone is that they start with plus three villagers, minus 50 wood and minus 200 food. This is probably what the Chinese are bestknown for and makes for a pretty crazy start on typical maps. Your first reaction playing them is probablyeither: “This is amazing, I have double the villagers!” or “Wow, this is terrible. I have no food.” It is always smart to get loom at some pointearly on to keep your Town Centre working, but, other than that, the biggest priorityis just getting food. If you don’t see your sheep quickly, it’snot a bad idea to scout with a few villagers, but the biggest thing is to just get themall working in any way that you can. Whether it’s with chopping a bit of wood tomake up for having 50 less, or even better, grabbing some food from a berry bush or luringa boar. It doesn’t help to be picky about the foodsource and you just have to be a bit opportunistic like that. Another little tip is to try to suppress yournatural reactions if you normally put down two houses, since that means that you won’thave enough wood for a lumber camp under standard settings. I like to make just one house at the startor right away with the eighth villager after your first seven go on food and I just findthat makes things run smoother. A big question that’s usually asked aboutthis bonus, though, is whether or not you’re actually ahead in population. And the answer is: you probably are, but notby as many villagers as it initially appears because of that minus 200 food and resultingTown Center idle time. To get a sense of it, let’s run a regulargame with constant villager production for

Default <strong>strategy tactics</strong>: <strong>dark</strong> ages”>To get a sense of it, let’s run a regulargame with constant villager production for a generic civilization, starting with threevillagers, and we’ll try some Chinese starts and see how the populations compare. Hello ladies and gentlemen, Spirit of theLaw here. This video is gonna be all about the Chinese.We finally get to talk about the civilization that invented guns, block printing and cannonsand then got none of those in its tech tree. Though to be fair, the Chinese invented prettymuch every medieval technology. Now personally, while learning the <strong>game</strong>, I always found theChinese to be one of the most difficult civilizations to use well. And they have a really strangestart with all their extra villagers and also a unique unit that has more going on behindthe scenes that probably any other. I’ll try to keep this short, but there’s a lot to cover,so let’s jump into it. The Chinese team bonus is that their farmshave +45 food. Now there’s a few aspects of this to look at and I’ll put all that informationin a table. If we think of farms as a way of turning 60 wood into several hundred foodover time, the Chinese bonus is giving you a better conversion rate, which makes it moreof a wood than a food bonus. Though if we look at the actual improvement, we can seeit goes from a solid 26% better ratio early on down to only an 8% improvement by the ImperialAge. If we look at the actual collection rate, theoretically it does go up slightly becauseyour farms are lasting a bit longer, so you’re spending less time proportionally reseedingthem. But it’s not a very notable increase and at best it’s about one extra food everythree minutes and becomes steadily worse over the course of the <strong>game</strong>.But speaking of that delay to having to refresh them, check out the time it takes to exhausta farm, which is worth noting because I think it has some convenience value, for examplewhen you’re doing a fast Castle <strong>strategy</strong>. Normally all those farms that you’re puttingdown in the late <strong>Dark Age</strong> and early Feudal <strong>Age</strong> tend to be coming up on their nine-minutelifespan just after you reach the Castle <strong>Age</strong> and that’s the time that you’re usually tryingto get some more Town Centers and other buildings and units out. The extra two minutes thatthe Chinese and all of their allies get on those early farms means you’re gonna feela crunch a couple of minutes later, which, just subjectively speaking, I think makesthings feel more manageable and to me is the big advantage of the bonus.Moving on to their civ bonuses, the first one is that they start with plus three villagers,minus 50 wood and minus 200 food. This is probably what the Chinese are best known forand makes for a pretty crazy start on typical maps. Your first reaction playing them isprobably either: “This is amazing, I have double the villagers!” or “Wow, this is terrible.I have no food.” It is always smart to get loom at some point early on to keep your TownCentre working, but, other than that, the biggest priority is just getting food. Ifyou don’t see your sheep quickly, it’s not a bad idea to scout with a few villagers,but the biggest thing is to just get them all working in any way that you can. Whetherit’s with chopping a bit of wood to make up for having 50 less, or even better, grabbingsome food from a berry bush or luring a boar. It doesn’t help to be picky about the foodsource and you just have to be a bit opportunistic like that. Another little tip is to try tosuppress your natural reactions if you normally put down two houses, since that means thatyou won’t have enough wood for a lumber camp under standard settings. I like to make justone house at the start or right away with the eighth villager after your first sevengo on food and I just find that makes things run smoother.A big question that’s usually asked about this bonus, though, is whether or not you’reactually ahead in population. And the answer is: you probably are, but not by as many villagersas it initially appears because of that minus 200 food and resulting Town Center idle time.To get a sense of it, let’s run a regular <strong>game</strong> with constant villager production fora generic civilization, starting with three villagers, and we’ll try some Chinese startsand see how the populations compare. Let’s say you find the sheep right away and it’sa near perfect start and you manage to get them under your town center by 20 to 25 seconds.You’ll find you can start new villager production by about 50 seconds. Now that’s a solidstart, but, maybe surprisingly, at that point you’re only one villager ahead of a genericcivilization and you’re still behind by 20 wood and about 50 food. Now it’s notquite as bad as it seems, since you do have loom so once your opponent researches thatyou’ll be two villagers ahead from that point on. Remember, that’s if you get thesheep in right away, though. If it takes you a bit longer to find your sheep and they’rearriving at around 50 seconds, which is pretty reasonable if you have to explore a bit tofind them, that puts you on even villager </p><p><img src=